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Title: FIP 2003: Programme of the Board of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Date: 03-Mar-2003
Category: Affiliations

FIP 2003

Programme of the Board of Pharmaceutical Sciences (BPS)

Saturday, 6 September 2003
09.00-17.00

Symposium 1: Oral drug delivery and absorption: Mechanisms and problem solving strategies (part 1)

Organisers: Vinod Shah, CDER, FDA, USA and Andrew McLachlan, University of Sydney, Australia

Although oral drug delivery is the most widely used and accepted dosage form, there are still problems in oral drug delivery and absorption. This symposium will address the questions: Does drug delivery deliver? And: Is the delivered drug absorbed? Speakers will discuss the mechanisms around drug delivery from the dosage form. Possible interactions of specially designed dosage form will interact with the mucosal surfaces of the gut to increase drug absorption predictably and reproducibly. Problem solving strategies and regulatory considerations and pharmacoeconomical aspects will also be addressed.
(Each lecture takes 30 minutes, 30 minutes break and 30 minutes discussion)

09.00-12.00

Does drug delivery deliver?

Chairman: Vinod Shah, CDER, FDA, USA
Co-chairman: Hans Junginger, University of Leiden, The Netherlands

  1. Overview  Setting the stage (Where we have come from, and where are we going), William Charman, University of Monash, Parkville, Australia
  2. Physiological and physico-chemical factors to be considered in oral drug delivery, Clive Wilson, Glasgow, UK
  3. Dome matrix for time and site control in oral drug delivery, Paolo Colombo, Parma, Italy
  4. Lead optimisation strategies for improving oral bioavailability, Susan Charman, University of Monash, Parkville, Australia
  5. Hepatic considerations and issues for drug delivery, Michael Roberts, University of Monash, Parkville,
    Australia


14.00-17.00 Symposium continued

Chairman: Kamal Midha, University of Saskatchewan, Canada
Co-chairman: Michael Roberts, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

  1. Lymphatic drug delivery  an ignored pathway and opportunity, Chris Porter, University of Monash, Parkville, Australia
  2. Pharmacogenomic considerations in oral drug delivery, Vincent Lee, University of Southern California, Los
    Angeles
    , USA
     
  3. Technology aspects in oral modified release formulations and pharmacoeconomical considerations
    Hans Junginger,
    University of Leiden, The Netherlands

2 Oral communications selected from submitted abstracts

Discussion


Sunday, 7 September 2003
09.00-17.00

Oral drug delivery and absorption: Mechanisms and problem solving strategies (part 2)

Organisers: Vinod Shah, CDEA, FDA, USA and Andrew McLachlan, University of Sydney, Australia


09.00-12.00

Is the delivered drug being absorbed?
Chairman: Andrew McLachlan, University of Sydney, Australia
Co-chairman: Vincent Lee, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA

  1. How can you ensure that the delivered drug is absorbed? What are the factors that may influence this?
    Rashmi Barbhaiya, India 
  2. Role of transporters in oral drug absorption, Yuichi Sugiyama, University of Tokyo, Japan
  3. Impact of polymorphism/metabolism in drug absorption, Andrew Somogyi, Australia
  4. Role of PK/PD and population analysis in drug delivery, Andrew McLachlan, University of Sydney, Australia
  5. Drug-drug interactions: How it affects drug absorption and bioavailability, Les Benet, University of California, San Francisco, USA 

14.00-17.00 Symposium continued

Chairman: William Charman, University of Monash, Parkville, Australia
Co-chairman: Yuichi Sugiyama, University of Tokyo, Japan

  1. Modern delivery systems for peroral absorption of peptides, Hans Junginger, University of Leiden, The Netherlands
  2. Role of exposure/response relationship in oral drug delivery, Avi Yacobi, USA, Vinod Shah, USA
  3. Regulatory considerations for oral drug delivery, Vinod Shah, USA

2 Oral communications selected from submitted abstracts Discussion

Saturday, 6 September 2003
09.00-17.00

Symposium 2: Input of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics to drug discovery (part 1)

Chairman: Gavin Brooks, UK
Co-chairman: Ross McKinnon, Australia

The purpose of these two symposia is to provide pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists with an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of how genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics are impacting on the pharmaceutical and health care industries. Each lecture will be given by a leader in the field and the programmes for both symposia are designed to address cutting-edge research in the genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics areas. The scientific content of both symposia will be sufficiently broad to be of interest to anyone wishing to learn more about the technologies involved.

09.00-12.00

(Each lecture takes 40 minutes, 30 minutes break and 30 minutes discussion)

  1. General overview of the technologies and their applications in medicine, Speaker TBA
  2. The human genome in the post-genomic era, Speaker TBA
  3. Sequencing of the rice genome, Speaker TBA

Discussion

14.00-17.00 Symposium continued

  1. Proteomics and bioinformatics in drug discovery, Donny Strosberg, Hybrigenics, France
  2. Chemogenomics as a strategy for generating small molecule compounds, Ray Salemme, USA


2-3 Oral communications selected from submitted abstracts

Discussion

Sunday, 7 September 2003
09.00-17.00

Symposium 2: Input of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics to drug discovery (part 2)

Chairman: Gavin Brooks, UK
Co-chairman: Ross McKinnon, Australia

09.00-12.00

  1. Use of proteomics to predict toxicology, Speaker TBA
  2. Geronomics: the application of profiling techniques to ageing research, Speaker TBA
  3. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics  the Pharmacists perspective, Ross McKinnon, Australia


14.00-17.00 Symposium continued

  1. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics  the Industrialists perspective, Mark Payton, UK
  2. Ethical and legal implications of pharmacogenomics/proteomics, Speaker TBA


2-3 Oral communications selected from submitted abstracts

Discussion

Special Interest Groups Meetings

Sunday,7 September 2003

SIG: Bioavailability/Bioequivalence:

09.00-10.30
Chair:Vinod Shah,USA

SIG: Quality Chemicals:

10.30-12.00
Chair:Susanne Keitel,Germany

SIG: Pharmacoeconomics/Pharmacoepidemiology:

12.00-13.30
Chair:Bert Leufkens,The Netherlands

SIG: Radiological Pharmacy:

13.30-15.30
Chair:Stanley Shaw,USA

SIG: Pharmaceutical Biotechnology:

15.30-17.30
Chair:Gavin Brooks,USA

SIG: Nuclear/Radiologic Pharmacy

Monday,8 September 2003
09.00-12.00

Therapeutic drug monitoring with radiologic techniques

Chairman:Gordon Chan,Australia
Objective:
This session aims at introducing clinical pharmacists to radiologic techniques used within nuclear medicine for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM).As well as discussion on established techniques,this session will also delve into novel techniques that are being developed for drug development and evaluation and will also touch on what may be anticipated for the future.By the end of the session the pharmacist should have an understanding of how radiologic techniques are used to both diagnose disease states and monitor the progress of drug therapy.

  1. Current TDM techniques used in nuclear medicine, Gordon Chan,BCNP,Austin and Repatriation Medical
    Centre,Sydney,Australia 
    Objective: The emergence of small animal PET to determine drug pharmacokinetics and its role in developing new drugs
  2. Positron emission tomography (PET)and small animal PET
    Michael Kassiou,
    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital,Sydney, Australia
    Objective:MRS as a modality that can be used to study drug pathways, cell metabolites and the fate of drugs 
  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)
    Mark Wellard,
    Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne,Australia

Discussion

SIG:BA/BE

Monday,8 September 2003
09.00-12.00

Science and regulations for new biopharmaceutical issues

Moderators:Vinod Shah,USA and Allan Evans,Australia

  1. Bioequivalence issues: discussion and delination approaches
    Kamal Midha,
    University of Saskatchewan,Canada
  2. Issues and challenges in BE evalution in Australia and New Zealand
    Raymond Wilson, Australia
  3. Issues and challenges in dissolution/in vitro release of drug products
    Jennifer Dressman,
    J.W.Goethe University,Frankfurt,Germany
  4. In vitro-invivo correlation in the design and evaluation of oral dosage forms
    Allan Evans,
    Australia
  5. Biopharmaceutics classification system what progress have we made?
    Vinod
    Shah,USA

 



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